Collection Lambert
en Avignon
5 rue Violette
84 000 Avignon
Open every day
Except Monday from 11am to 6pm.
July-August, open every day
From 11am to 7pm.
Exhibition
06 july > 05 nov. 2017

ON AIME L'ART...!!

Un choix d'Éric Mézil parmi les oeuvres de la Collection agnès b.

Malick Sidibé, Nuit de noël, 1965, tirage noir et blanc
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Malick Sidibé, Nuit de noël, 1965, tirage noir et blanc

While exhibitions have already revealed some of the major works collected by clothes designer agnès b. for over thirty years, the idea of carrying out her multi-faceted portrait project was never conceived on this scale. Both designer, and director of a film selected at the Venice Mostra, My name is Hmmmm, intimately linked with the world of music, patron of the arts agnès b. has been, above all, a great discoverer of artists since the opening of the agnès b. Galerie du Jour in 1983. 

 

Sharing the same passion for art, the same love of creation and individuals involved with the most sensitive aspects of life, agnès b. and Yvon Lambert connect on so many levels both through their intense involvement with the artists they are involved with, and also because of their eclectic nature and avant-garde vision, making them witnesses of the times they live in. 

 

So, it’s no surprise that 400 works from the agnès b. collection now adorn the spaces of our institution, like so many witnesses drawing a portrait of this woman freed from all convention and a collection focussed on the avant-garde, including works acquired to be shared. 

 

This exhibition takes the form of a journey of the senses and is organised around great artists she has often been the first to collect, and also worldly relationships or unusual aesthetics and strong ideas that seem like happy obsessions. 

 

Just as commitment and politics permeate agnès b’s. own journey through and through, they will make their mark on the entirety of this exceptional presentation. Painting, love, reverie, music, experimental cinema, adolescence, modernity, the avant-garde, the transcending of established borders, whether physical, social or mental, Africa – these are all aesthetic landscapes offered to the visitor to explore through the richness and diversity of the exhibited works, crossed by the need for total commitment to the experience of life and the struggle for freedom.

 

The artistes

A-ONE, Berenice Abbott, Absalon, Jef Aerosol, Leila Alaoui, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Kenneth Anger, Diane Arbus, Eve Arnold, Fernando Arrabal, L’Atlas, agnès b., Gaston Bachelard, Hei Bai, Roger Ballen, Banksy, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Bäst, Sir Cecil Beaton, Ernest J. Bellocq, Abdelkader Benchamma, Edo Bertoglio, Richard Billingham, Pierre Bodo, Alighiero Boetti, Léonard Bourgois-Beaulieu, Éric Bouttier, Emanuel Bovet, Brassaï, Frédéric Bruly Bouabré, Jared Buckhiester, Pierre Buraglio, Alexander Calder, Cyprien Chabert, Roman Cieslewicz, Larry Clark, Claude Closky, Jean Cocteau, Denise Colomb, Pierre Comte, Serge Comte, Chano Devi, Nicolas Dieterlé, Alain Dister, Robert Doisneau, Claudine Doury, Shepard Fairey, Nat Finkelstein, Futura 2000, Cyprien Gaillard, Regina José, Galindo, Gilbert & George, Stephen Gill, Gina, Allen Ginsberg, John Giorno, John Goba, Nan Goldin, Douglas Gordon, Gotscho, Antoine Le Grand, Rafaël Gray, Bobby Grossman, Hervé Guibert, Raymond Hains, Simon Hantaï, Mona Hatoum, Lucien Hervé, Katsuhiko Hibino, Damien Hirst, Dennis Hopper, Peter Hujar, Ikon, Bodys Isek Kingelez, Izis, Cameron Jamie, Louis Jammes, JayOne, Jen-Cri, Daniel Johnston, Pablo Jomaron, JonOne, Donald Judd, Seydou Keïta, André Kertész, Pierre Klossowski, Alberto Korda, Harmony Korine, Germaine Krull, Tseng Kwong Chi, Helen Levitt, David Lynch, David Mach, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ryan McGinley, Wendy McMurdo, Jonas Mekas, Duane Michals, Vincent Michéa, Radenko Milak, Marcel Miracle, Pierre Molinier, Moze, Dominique Nabokov, NASA, Max Natkiel, Nebay, J. D. Okhai Ojeikere, Jean-Michel Othoniel, Abbé Pierre, Richard Prince, Lola Reboud, Hugues Reip, Pierre René-Worms, Clare Richardson, Alexandre Rodtchenko, Werner Rohde, Willy Ronis, Christian Rose, Dieter Roth, Chéri Samba, Amadou Sanogo, Richard Schroeder, Malick Sidibé, Roman Signer, Patti Smith, Jivya Soma Mashe, Takeshi Sumi, Claire Tabouret, Dominique Tarlé, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Barthélémy Toguo, Gus Van Sant, Alan Vega, André Villiers, Massimo Vitali, Andy Warhol, John Waters, Bruce Weber, Weegee, Roger Welch, Robert Wilson, William Wilson

Une exposition du 40e anniversaire du Centre Pompidou
06 july > 05 nov. 2017

LA VIE SECRÈTE DES PLANTES

Anselm Kiefer, Wolfgang Laib, Joseph Beuys, Lothar Baumgarten

Anselm Kiefer, La vie secrète des plantes, 2001-2002, branchage, gesso, fil de fer, plomb, toile, 380 x 1500 cm, 6 éléments de 190 x 280cm 4 éléments de 190 x 330cm © Anselm Kiefer, (c) Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI/Philippe Migeat/Dist. RMN-GP
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Anselm Kiefer, La vie secrète des plantes, 2001-2002, branchage, gesso, fil de fer, plomb, toile, 380 x 1500 cm, 6 éléments de 190 x 280cm 4 éléments de 190 x 330cm © Anselm Kiefer, (c) Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI/Philippe Migeat/Dist. RMN-GP

As part of the 40th anniversary celebrations for the Pompidou Centre, Lambert Collection is hosting one of the most iconic works by Anselm Kiefer, a major figure on the international art scene and the Lambert Collection.

 

In 2003, thanks to the generosity of Yvon Lambert, The Secret life of Plants, a monumental installation of 10 paintings on frames over which intermingle paint, branches, wire and lead sheeting, became part of the Pompidou Centre’s national collections. 

 

At a time when this Paris institution celebrated its 40th anniversary, it was only natural for the Lambert Collection to become involved with this anniversary project by exhibiting in the high-ceilinged room of its new spaces, the monumental work of this great German artist who Yvon Lambert helped get established in France, where he still lives and works, and whose work he champions in his Paris gallery. 

 

Some of Anselm Kiefer’s prestigious works from the collection’s stock have been included in this ensemble of major works, as well as works from other German artists, the most important figures in the contemporary art scene, taken from public and private collections: Joseph Beuys whose pupil was Anselm Kiefer, at the famous school Dusseldorf School as well as Lothar Baumgarten and Wolgang Laib for whom the artist has particular admiration to the point that he opened one of his famous wax corridors in his workshop/living space in Barjac in the south of France.

 

Through the sensitive dialogue initiated between the works of these artists, The Secret life of Plants alternately summons up History, ancient myths and the philosophies of the stars, and in a cosmogony that pays homage to the power of nature, the poetic relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm unveils room by room, the secrets of a universe where magical and essential interactions between the earthly world and that of the stars unfolds. 

 

Austerity and profusion thus draw the contours of a relationship of man to nature and to his own essence where only the poetry of experience opens the way to a common reflection on existence.

 

“In 2017, the Centre Pompidou is celebrating its 40th anniversary throughout France. To share the celebration with a wider audience, it will be presenting a completely new

programme of exhibitions, outstanding loans and various events throughout the year. 

Exhibitions, shows, concerts and meetings will be staged in 40 French cities in partnership with museums, contemporary art centres, performance halls, a festival, a key player in France’s cultural and artistic fabric and many more. 

At the crossroads of different disciplines, like the Centre Pompidou, this programme show the Centre Pompidou’s commitment, since its creation, side by side with the cultural institutions throughout France - essential players in the dissemination and development of art in our time.”

 

Exhibition
06 july > 05 nov. 2017

LEILA ALAOUI

Je te pardonne

Leila Alaoui, Les Marocains (Souk de Boumia), 2011
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Leila Alaoui, Les Marocains (Souk de Boumia), 2011

Leila Alaoui is a French-Moroccan photographer and video artist born in 1982 and died in January 2016 during terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou.

 

Endlessly crossing geographies as numerous as they are diverse, she explores the construction of identity, cultural diversity and migration, especially in the Mediterranean area.

Photography and video are used in turn to represent social realities through visual language that sensitively combines documentary aesthetics and visual arts. 

 

Observer and humanist, Leila Alaoui invites us to participate in the joint project to watch and listen to each other’s stories, shared in a singular intimacy which annihilates distance, removing any idea of exoticism and making us empathise with those being filmed or photographed. This is illustrated by the 10 large photographs from the series Les Marocains through which the artist paints the majestic portrait of the different Moroccan communities, or the images of the No Pasará series, and the video Crossings, confronting the dreams and aspirations of young Moroccans imagining an El Dorado on the other side of the Mediterranean, with the harsh reality or the impossibility of crossing over.

 

I Forgive You, an exhibition of the artist’s photographs and videos organised with the Leila Alaoui Association and Galleria Continua, is the sensitive, humanist response to the terror that led to the death of the young Leila Alaoui. 

 

Exhibition
06 july > 05 nov. 2017

KEITH HARING

Sans Titre / Untitled, 1985, Acrylique sur bâche 295 x 457 cm
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Sans Titre / Untitled, 1985, Acrylique sur bâche 295 x 457 cm

"He was the first truly public artist, in the fullest sense of the word, his art and his life changed our conceptions of art and life in the 20th century." 

Andy Warhol

 

Keith Haring was born in Pittsburgh, in 1958; he started drawing at the age of four. He drew incessantly, inspired first by the Walt Disney cartoons and Batman comics as a child and by the sounds of Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith and the Grateful Dead in his adolescence. 

 

After three years at the Pittsburgh School of Visual Arts, he moved to New York in 1978 to continue his studies. Like the Futura 2000 graffiti artists and Jean-Michel Basquiat, with whom he became a close friend; Keith Haring spent his nights in the subway covering its billboards and trains with his drawings and paintings. He participated in the first show to be uniquely dedicated to Street Art, at Club 57 in 1980. After this he presented his works in a series of shows all over the world and wall-paintings in the New York subway, although he stopped doing them in 1986 having been repeatedly arrested for urban vandalism even when the police officers in question knew of his art and were fans of his work. 

 

Jean-Michel Basquiat introduced him to Andy Warhol, another Pittsburgh native, or Andy Mouse as Haring liked to call him. In spite of his 1984 show at the famous Leo Castelli gallery, best known for showcasing the works of the Pop Art movement and the American Avant-garde of the fifties, Keith Haring decided to follow the example of Warhol's Factory by opening his own Pop Shop merchandising boutique at 292 Lafayette Street. His friends Madonna and Grace Jones were the guardian angels of this unique address where the artist showed he had no fear of the democratisation of his art.

 

He was in Japan when he learned of the death of his friend Jean-Michel Basquiat on the 12 August 1988 after an overdose. On the flight home he noted that his skin was covered with marks which he immediately recognised as the symptoms of AIDS. With two years left to live he concentrated the time he had left on monumental public commissions, sculptures and wall-paintings; including the famous "The Crak is Wrak" on a handball court which sought to raise awareness amongst adolescents increasingly subject to the ravages of hard drug addiction. He created the Keith Haring Foundation to help children and support organisations in the fight against AIDS. Charity works were completed all over the globe, denouncing racism, apartheid, homophobia and discrimination. He worked in a frenzy right up to his last breathe, completing works with children from the Necker Hospital in Paris, New York orphanages and for the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty. He died in February 1990, he was just 31.